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I wrote this back in 2008 and while heart health is just as relevant today, what is good for avoiding heart issues is also good for lessening the severity of a cardiac event if one does happen. If you do have a cardiac event, less severe is the best way to acquire life insurance and get the best possible approved rate.

A friend of mine used to say that I talked and wrote in word salads. Never did figure out what that meant so I just keep rattling on. If I lose you, hang in there until the end and there is a better than 40% chance that I will make some relevant point. Obviously it makes sense that not having a cardiac event is a good way to ensure better life insurance rates, so how do we accomplish that? In a post yesterday I brought up the antioxidant idea. A little wine, a little dark chocolate, etc.

Today Reader’s Digest lays out the whole game plan. We know that fit versus fat is a good thing. Not smoking and exercising regularly are good things. But, as only Reader’s Digest can, they offer a condensed version of 30 ways to avoid blowing up and splattering heart parts all over.

From a life insurance underwriting point of view this game plan and avoiding a heart attack is going to put you into the home run life insurance rate category, the rates I wish I was paying. But also consider that underwriters would look more favorably on an applicant who had cardiac issues and started following these guidelines. They truly like to see and reward those who take what has happened seriously and change their lifestyle.

Bottom line. Life is so much more enjoyable when you have been and are taking care of yourself. Having said that, cardiac events can happen to anyone, even those that seem the most unlikely because they have a healthy life style. If you have questions or would like to discuss your heart health and life insurance, call or email me directly. My name is Ed Hinerman. Let’s talk